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User-Defined Types

[public | private] (struct | union | protocol) [name-id]
{
    [ element-decl; [ element-decl; … ] ]
};

[public | private] case_union [name-id]
{
    case expression1:
        [ element_decl; … ]
    [
    case expression2:
        [ element_decl; … ]
    …
    ]
    [
    default:
        [ element_decl; … ]
    ]
};

element-decl:
  [ (field-decl | typedef-decl | const_decl | user-defined-type-decl) ; …]

field-decl:
  type var-decl [, var-decl …] ;
  
var-decl:
  (id | id[expression] | id:expression | id as type-id * [(expression)] )

The first syntax form allows you to define structure or union, while the second form allows you to define a case union.

When public keyword is placed before the structure declaration, the structure becomes a public user-defined type and appears in Protocols List Tool Window. A private keyword may be used to prevent the structure from being listed in the list of user-defined types in the Structure Binding dialog. If omitted, a structure declaration is private by default. Applies only to user-defined types, declared on the global scope.

A special directives may appear within a declaration of a structure, union or a case union:

hidden:
visible:

A hidden: directive hides all subsequent fields and visible: directive makes fields visible. By default, all fields are visible. Hiding a field only hides it from the screen, the field remain visible when referenced in expressions.

This and subsequent sections provide an in-depth description of user-defined types.

Each user-defined type creates a scope. All enclosed constants, enumerations, typedefs, native functions and user-defined types are then included into this newly created scope.

A structure, union or case union may be nameless. Nameless types are allowed anywhere besides the global scope. A nameless type may also be used in the typedef declaration:

typedef struct
{
    // …
} A;

equivalent to:

struct A
{
    // …
};

while the following fragment creates a structure named A and its aliases B and C:

typedef struct A
{
    // …
} B,C;